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>> Defining Nephrology
 
Nephrology is the branch of internal medicine dealing with the study of the function and diseases of the kidney. Most diseases affecting the kidney are not limited to the organ itself, but are systemic disorders. Nephrology concerns itself with the diagnosis of kidney disease and its treatment (medication, dialysis), and follow-up of renal transplant patients. Additionally, nephrologistsare specialists in the care of electrolyte disorders and hypertension.

As with the rest of medicine, important clues as to the cause of any symptom are gained in the history and physical examination.

Laboratory tests are almost always aimed at: urea, creatinine, electrolytes, and urinalysis-- which is frequently the key test in suggesting a diagnosis.

More specialized tests can be ordered to discover or link certain systemic diseases to kidney failure such as hepatitis b or hepatitis c, lupus serologies, paraproteinemias such as amyloidosis or multiple myeloma or various other systemic diseases that lead to kidney failure. Collection of a 24-hour sample of urine can give valuable information on the filtering capacity of the kidney and the amount of protein loss in some forms of kidney disease. However, 24-hour urine samples have recently, in the setting of chronic renal disease, been replaced by spot urine ratio of protein and creatinine.

Other tests often performed by nephrologists are:
  • Renal biopsy, to obtain a tissue diagnosis of a disorder when the exact nature or stage remains uncertain.;
  • Ultrasound scanning of the urinary tract and occasionally examining the renal blood vessels;
  • CT scanning when mass lesions are suspected or to help diagnosis nephrolithiasis;
  • Scintigraphy (nuclear medicine) for accurate measurment of renal function (rarely done), diagnosis of renal artery disease, or 'split function' of each kidney;
  • Angiography or Magnetic resonance imaging angiography when the blood vessels might be affected
Many kidney diseases are treated with medication, such as steroids, DMARDs (disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs), antihypertensives (many kidney diseases feature hypertension). Often erythropoietin and vitamin D treatment is required to replace these two hormones, the production of which stagnates in chronic renal disease.

When symptoms of renal failure become too severe, dialysis might be required.
 
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